Written by Dr. Savannah Muncy, Pharm.D on
December 11, 2021
Reading Time: 5 minutes

Medically Reviewed by our Medical Affairs Team

Written by Dr. Savannah Muncy, Pharm.D on:

So supplements for depression are a hot topic.

With so much research being done to find the best supplements for anxiety and depression, it can be hard to know which supplements you should be taking.

In this blog post, we will go over what supplements GPs recommend as well as what supplements I take on a regular basis.

In addition, we will go over how these supplements work and also some of the side effects that might happen from taking them.

So, let’s get started.

Do supplements for depression really work?

The answer to this question is yes and no.

Supplements for depression work differently for everyone, so it’s hard to say whether or not they will definitely work for you.

However, GPs typically recommend supplements such as omega-three fatty acids, magnesium, and St John’s wort as the first line of treatment when it comes to supplements for depression.

Each of these supplements has been shown to help improve mood, decrease anxiety symptoms, and promote better sleep.

Omega-three fatty acids are a type of essential fatty acid that is found in fish oil supplements.

These supplements have been shown to be beneficial for mental health because they help increase serotonin concentrations in the brain.

For supplements for depression, it is recommended that you take high-quality fish oil supplements because they contain a higher concentration of omega-three fatty acids compared to other supplements or foods with this ingredient.

Magnesium has been shown to help improve mood and reduce symptoms of stress and anxiety by acting as an antagonist to NMDA receptors.

This means that magnesium can help keep glutamate, a neurotransmitter that is linked to anxiety and depression, from overstimulating the brain.

Lastly, St John’s Wort is a herbal supplement that has been shown to be effective in treating mild to moderate cases of depression.

It works by increasing levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine in the brain.

However, supplements for depression are not covered by medical insurance companies so it’s important to check with your doctor before choosing supplements as treatment options.

How do supplements for depression work?

As I mentioned earlier, there are many supplements that can be recommended by GPs when it comes to supplements for depression.

But how do these supplements work and why are they recommended as a primary treatment?

Well, each of the supplements mentioned above works in different ways to help improve mood and decrease anxiety and depression symptoms.

Omega-three fatty acids help increase serotonin levels in the brain, magnesium helps regulate NMDA receptors, and St John’s Wort supplements help increase levels of serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine in the brain.

However, supplements for depression work differently for everyone and each person might need a combination of specific supplements to achieve results.

What side effects can I expect from supplements?

There are many different side effects that can occur from taking supplements for depression.

Some of the most common side effects are gastrointestinal problems such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Others include headaches, fatigue, anxiety, and insomnia.

It’s important to be aware of these potential side effects before starting any supplements for depression and to report them to your GP if they occur.

Are supplements for depression covered by insurance?

No, supplements for depression are not typically covered by medical insurance companies.

However, if you are experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression and would like to try supplements as a treatment option, be sure to speak with your GP about it.

They will be able to recommend the best supplements that will work for your needs and provide you with a prescription.

What is a good substitute for antidepressants?

If supplements for depression are not covered by insurance or you are not interested in taking them, there are other alternatives that might be a good fit for you.

Some people choose to try therapy as a way to treat their symptoms of anxiety and depression.

This is a great option for those who want to talk about their feelings and explore their thoughts and emotions in a safe and supportive environment.

Others might choose to try antidepressants as a way to treat their symptoms.

There are many different types of antidepressants available and your GP will be able to find the best one for you.

Lastly, some people might choose to self-manage their anxiety or depression by practicing mindfulness and meditation.

This is a great way to reduce your symptoms of anxiety and depression without the use of supplements or medications.

What supplements for depression can I take?

Here are some supplements that you might hear about when it comes to supplements for depression:

Each of these supplements works in different ways to help improve mood and decrease anxiety and depression symptoms.

However, it’s important to speak with your GP before starting any supplements as they will be able to recommend the best one for you.

What are the benefits of taking supplements for depression?

There are many great benefits to taking supplements for depression.

Some of the most common include:

  • Having a more positive outlook on life
  • Feeling less stressed, anxious, or depressed
  • Being able to focus better
  • Having increased energy levels.

What vitamins help with depression and fatigue?

B vitamins are one of the supplements that people might use to help with depression and fatigue.

These B Vitamins include:

Thiamine (B1)

Thiamine is important for the nervous system and helps to produce energy from food.

People who are deficient in thiamine may experience fatigue, irritability, and depression.

Riboflavin (B2)

Riboflavin is important for the health of the skin, eyes, and mouth.

It also helps to produce energy from food.

People who are deficient in riboflavin may experience depression, anemia, inflamed lips, and tongue sores.

Niacin (B3, 4, 5)

Niacin is also known as vitamin B-complex.

It is important for the nervous system and helps to produce energy from food.

People who are deficient in niacin may experience fatigue, loss of appetite, and depression.

Pantothenic Acid (B6)

Also known as Vitamin B-complex, pantothenic acid works closely with niacin and is important for the nervous system.

People who are deficient in pantothenic acid may experience fatigue, irritability, and depression.

Pyridoxine (B7)

Pyridoxine is also known as vitamin B-complex.

It helps to break down proteins into amino acids and is important for the nervous system.

People who are deficient in pyridoxine may experience fatigue, irritability, and depression.

Folic Acid (B9)

Folic acid is a water-soluble vitamin that is important for pregnant women and those who are trying to conceive.

It helps to form red blood cells and is important for the nervous system.

People who are deficient in folic acid may experience anemia, fatigue, and depression.

Cobalamin (B12)

Also known as vitamin B-complex, cobalamin is important for the nervous system and helps to produce energy from food.

People who are deficient in cobalamin may experience fatigue, irritability, and depression.

If you are looking for supplements for anxiety and depression, speak with your GP to see if any of these supplements might be right for you.

There are many different types of supplements that can help improve mood and decrease symptoms of anxiety and depression

All of these vitamins are essential in the body and help to keep you healthy.

They also play a role in mood and energy levels and can help to decrease symptoms of depression and fatigue.

Speak with your GP if you’re interested in taking supplements for depression or fatigue as they will be able to recommend the best one for you.

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